Could the US-China trade row become a global cold war?

A few years ago, as part of a western delegation to China, I met Xi Jinping in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People. When addressing us, Xi argued that China’s rise would be peaceful, and that other countries – namely, the US – need not worry about the “Thucydides trap”, so named for the Greek historian who chronicled how Sparta’s fear of a rising Athens made war between the two inevitable. In his 2017 book Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap?, Harvard University’s Graham Allison examines 16 earlier rivalries between an emerging and an established power, and finds that 12 of them led to war. No doubt, Xi wanted us to focus on the remaining four.

Despite the mutual awareness of the Thucydides trap – and the recognition that history is not deterministic – China and the US seem to be falling into it anyway. Though a hot war between the world’s two major powers still seems far-fetched, a cold war is becoming more likely.

The US blames China for the current tensions. Since joining the World Trade Organization in 2001, China has reaped the benefits of the global trading and investment system, while failing to meet its obligations and free riding on its rules. According to the US, China has gained an unfair advantage through intellectual property theft, forced technology transfers, subsidies for domestic firms and other instruments of state capitalism. At the same time, its government is becoming increasingly authoritarian, transforming China into an Orwellian surveillance state.

For their part, the Chinese suspect that the US’s real goal is to prevent them from rising any further or projecting legitimate power and influence abroad. In their view, it is only reasonable that the world’s second-largest economy (by GDP) would seek to expand its presence on the world stage. And leaders would argue that their regime has improved the material welfare of 1.4 billion Chinese far more than the west’s gridlocked political systems ever could.

Regardless of which side has the stronger argument, the escalation of economic, trade, technological, and geopolitical tensions may have been inevitable. What started as a trade war now threatens to escalate into a permanent state of mutual animosity. This is reflected in the Trump administration’s national security strategy, which deems China a strategic “competitor” that should be contained on all fronts.

 Read more at The Guardian

Current News

Coming Soon in China: ‘Social Credit’ for Companies, Too

Coming Soon in China: ‘Social Credit’ for Companies, Too

A key target of China’s coming “social credit” system, which among Westerners usually triggers visions of “1984”-style monitoring of people, is actually misbehaving businesses...  Read more

The New York Times faces questions over Kavanaugh story

The New York Times faces questions over Kavanaugh story

Between an offensive tweet and a significant revision, The New York Times’ handling of a new sexual misconduct allegation against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh attracted almost as much...  Read more

The Navy Says Those UFO Videos Are Real

The Navy Says Those UFO Videos Are Real

And they were never meant to be released to the public...  Read more

Combative Lewandowski frustrates Democrats, as impeachment-probe hearing descends into disarray

Combative Lewandowski frustrates Democrats, as impeachment-probe hearing descends into disarray

The House Judiciary Committee's first hearing as part of its Trump impeachment investigation descended into chaos...  Read more

Stealing the 2020 Election: Ballot harvesting -- California's model

Stealing the 2020 Election: Ballot harvesting -- California's model

The Heritage Foundation calls it the “tool of choice for vote thieves.” The convenient, innovative, and beloved mail-in ballot...  Read more

Pearl Harbor like?  IRAN allegedly attacks Saudi Arabia disrupting world oil supply

Pearl Harbor like? IRAN allegedly attacks Saudi Arabia disrupting world oil supply

For many of the national security teams that monitor threats on the U.S., the apparent drone strike Saturday on the heart of Saudi Arabia’s oil production facilities was the realization of their worst fears...  Read more